Tagged: “newrr”

Leucistic Fox Squirrel

Two days ago, we had some interesting intakes! Take a look at this super amazing baby fox squirrel (Sciurus niger).

This little dude has a genetic mutation called leucism, which is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals caused by a recessive allele. Unlike albinism, it is a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. Albino have red eyes, lucistic have darker eyes. And yes, he is as yellowish as he looks! He may turn white as he gets older.

You can see below how he stands out from other squirrels around the same age in our incubator. Typically, animals with this kind of genetic mutation do not survive long in the wild. They kind of stand out. This guy will be destined for a life of education programs pending state approval.

While we do not name rehab animals, we are looking for name recommemdations since this guy will be destined for education. Mario wants to name it Ear Wax. Ew for short…. please help!

Nesting Materials for Birds

**warning: graphic photos at the bottom of this post!

Bird rehabbers have been battling for years the idea of putting things like hair, string, yarn, etc…out as nesting material for birds. Another perfect example of why that is a horrible idea. Two mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) chicks brought to us last night. One dead, one alive (cat found them, but that is a whole different conversation). Tied together at the knee by some kind of string. Lower leg completely dead. Had to be euthanized for a few different reasons. By permit, any bird that has to have a leg amputated has to be euthanized. We have no say in that matter. One legged birds develop all kinds of problems. Yes, we have seen one legged birds in the wild too.

Bird nest made with various materials such as string, yarn, etc.

Anywho… If you must put something out as nesting material for birds, use grasses, hay, etc… makes a much better and safer solution. Plus it’s natural, and in most cases free!

Fun fact: the mockingbird is the state bird of Texas (1927), Florida (1927), Arkansas(1929), Tennessee (1934), Mississippi (1944), and is the former state bird of South Carolina (1939-1948).