Great Horned Owl 2/23/2018

A great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) that a homeowner found in their yard. Thanks to good friends, Mark and Jennifer, for getting the bird to us.

https://youtu.be/oahCdymrJyE

Eastern Screech Owl – Red Phase

A male eastern screech owl (Megascops asio) that came in to the rescue after being found in the road.

https://youtu.be/290oMew3t0E

Baby Season is Here!

Baby Season is Here!

Took in some baby fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) 2 weeks ago. Growing like weeds. Feedings every 2 hours when they first came in. Up to every 3 hours now, including during the night.
Baby season has begun!

Cooper’s Hawk

Cooper’s Hawk

Cooper’s hawk (Accipiter cooperii) that came in the other day. Broken wing and very thin. Cooper’s hawks are normally the hawks that come feed at people’s bird feeders. They have really adapted to city life.

 

American Crow

American Crow

American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) that came into the rescue this weekend. Possible broken wing, dehydrated, and a little thin.

Very cool species of bird that will eat almost anything. From fruits and seeds, to insects, small lizards, eggs, and even other birds.

The origin of placing scarecrows in grain fields resulted from the crow’s incessant damaging and scavenging, although crows assist farmers by eating insects otherwise attracted to their crops.
These guys do pack one heck of a bite and have nice strong toes.

Red-tailed Hawk Release

Was a happy release this morning. Got to return this adult male red-tailed hawk back where he came from. The homeowners found this guy in their yard and brought him to us on December 8th. He had an injured wing and was thin. The homeowners have been watching this guy and his mate for a few years. At the end of the video you can see the tree he heads to. After we stopped recording, we noticed the female was already in the tree he landed in. A happy reunion!

https://youtu.be/LD3fSL6RgX8

Great Horned Owl Release

A quick video on the release of a great-horned owl that came in December 30th, very thin and dehydrated.

https://youtu.be/Be8MEoPziLY

Red-tailed Hawk Illegally Shot

Red-tailed Hawk Illegally Shot

*WARNING*
Graphic blood photos

Took in a female red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) that somebody shot in Hunt county. It is illegal to shoot migratory birds, except those with a hunting season during said season. This bird was shot in somebody’s yard, while their children were outside playing in the yard. Shooter pulled over and shot this bird with a rifle from the inside of their vehicle. Vehicle involved was identified but unfortunately no license plate information available. Information has been turned over to US Fish and Game, local Game Warden, and Sheriff’s office. 

A HUGE thank you goes out to the home owners and the Hunt County Scanner Facebook page and it’s owners for arranging to get this bird to us. It was an interesting night in the rain. Bird has been to our rehab vet and x-rays were done. We are optimistic this bird will make a full recovery and can be returned to the wild.

EDIT: For those wondering, the bird has a hood on its head to help keep it calm while we are examining it. Hoods are traditionally used for falconry birds, which is a cultural heritage that has been around more than 4,000 years, for that same reason. We have a wide variety of sizes, and these hoods are made a millimeter apart in size.


Evening Bat Admitted

Evening Bat Admitted

Took in this evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis) the other day from a local home owner that found it on the ground in her yard. This species is a true hibernating species, meaning it will have to stay in captivity until spring when it can be released. No injuries found at this time. Suspect it fell victim to the recent cold snap we experienced here in Fort Worth.

*DISCLAIMER*
Brandi has her rabies prexposure and gets her levels checked on a regular. Never touch a bat you find injured or on the ground. Their teeth are super sharp and can even go  through some gloves.

 

 

 

Imprinted Opossums

Imprinted Opossums

Took in a brother/sister pair of Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) that somebody tried to rehab after their mother was killed. Not sure how big they were when the person got them, but it was very early spring. Now these two are morbidly obese (male weighed in at 14 pounds, female at 11) , very imprinted to people, have never been outdoors, never learned how to hunt or forage for themselves, and they were fed a very poor diet.

For size reference, Brandi is 5’4″ and holding them against her body in the pictures.
They have also been kept together the entire time so there is the possibility that the female may be pregnant as opossums reach sexual maturity at an early age due to their short lifespan.
These two will NOT be able to be rehabbed and released to the wild.


Situations such as this are why permits are needed to rehab wildlife. It ensures proper training in care and medical needs to return wildlife back to the wild.